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Can all change be project management?

Project management  is about control of delivery to an agreed Time, Cost and Quality. They have a start, a middle, and an end. A key part of any project is generating deliverables as planned in the project plan/schedule. 

For an organisational change to be project managed, it most therefore have certain predictable properties: it has a start and an end. The organisation is stable between the start and end. The change can be accurately specified in terms of budget ( cost), delivery date ( time) and quality ( what we need delivered).

Are all organisational changes really like this? Are there types of organisational changes that can’t be project managed? For which project management is therefore ineffective? Some academic authors  think so….. 

Scope

There are two assignments in this module which test different parts of the subject area. Do NOT feel that you have to include every part of the module in Assignment 2.  Cover those parts which are most relevant

This is the second of two assignments in this module. The first assignment aims to cover human dynamics within a team, especially a new team faced with a new and unfamiliar objective. These are the type of dynamics a project manager needs to be aware of when forming a new project team. 

This second assignment looks outside of the project team to the human factors involved in delivering change within an organisation. What are these factors and how well do project and change management approaches address them?  What are the issues and  obstacles to delivering business change through projects and organisational change management methods? 

The impact and effect of project and change management approaches in delivering business change.

There are two assignments in this module which test different parts of the subject area. Do NOT feel that you have to include every part of the module in Assignment 2.  Cover those parts which are most relevant

This is the second of two assignments in this module. The first assignment aims to cover human dynamics within a team, especially a new team faced with a new and unfamiliar objective. These are the type of dynamics a project manager needs to be aware of when forming a new project team. 

This second assignment looks outside of the project team to the human factors involved in delivering change within an organisation. What are these factors and how well do project and change management approaches address them?  What are the issues and  obstacles to delivering business change through projects and organisational change management methods? 

 

 

The focus of the assignment

The title of this assignment implies to me that there ought to be some sort of statement about 

Getting the right level of detail in section 1

Its possible to describe  project management processes in very generic terms, for example, for the planning process group ( PMBOK) one could just say that this group is about “planning the  project”.  This doesn’t  demonstrate enough understanding of this process group and doesn’t give you much leverage on the case study.

You  need mention the key project management deliverables  from each process group and what their purpose is.  For example, when talking about the planning process,  you will need to describe the project management plan ( PMBOK, APM) briefly

What happens if I write more than 3000 words?

Nothing happens. The 3000 words is a guide to how much detail you have to  write.  You will not get any extra marks for writing more than 3000 words.  If you go well over the limit it is likely that you have gone off the point, or have gone into too much detail.

Change Management Organisation

You will need to discuss change management organisation. Most texts mention the roles of change manager, change sponsor and Change Agent.

Change Agent is seen as the most significant role, but there are several views as to what the role might be. Many see it as having semi-magical or divine powers ( to my mind anyway!).

The issue for project managing change is how to integrate these change roles with the project management ones.  I have given you one solution from Blake and Bush mainly because this is what I have found works for me when I have run change projects.  Other texts suggest that the project manager should be the change agent and argue that the discipline of project management should be enhanced to make this work.

This is similar to the suggestion that the project manager should provide the leadership necessary to make change succeed.

In previous years, with smaller class groups, we have discussed this and it seems that the project manager can be the change agent and provide the leadership, but only in small organisations, where the project manager has a clear and immediate link with the project change sponsor, for example if that sponsor was the project manager’s parent, or was visibly and actively supporting the project manager at every opportunity.

In all other cases the project manager needs to engage the leadership and authority embedded in the  organisation’s line management to drive the change through. Blake and Bush document a method of doing this.

This is anecdotal, so don’t quote me on it. What you need to describe are the normal change management roles and decide for yourself, consulting appropriate texts, how these can be integrated with the project management ones. There are other solutions out there somewhere. However you don’t need to go into too much detail